far from noise

In the Spotlight: Far from Noise

After spending around two hours of my yester-morning engaging with Far from Noise on my phone, I had one thought; a thought that set the vibe for the rest of the afternoon. That one thought? Holy shit. Not to give my entire backstory or get too personal, but I suffer from anxiety. I’m far more worried about the future and the past than the present, and I’m constantly stressing over the concept of death (too morbid? Sorry).

I felt personally connected to this game – I felt as if it was me who was talking to a deer (.. yes, a deer. Surprise!). I felt as if it was me teetering on the edge of a cliff, wondering if I would survive the night.

& for that, I gotta say — George Batchelor (Far from Noise‘s developer), you did a Hell of a job. I’ve never felt this much of a connection with a video game.

far from noise
Image Credit: Far from Noise, George Batchelor

Far from Noise sets you on the edge of a cliff, “where two characters discuss what it means to balance between life and death.” As an unnamed protagonist, you sit in an old rusting car – balancing on the edge of a cliff; questioning if you’ll survive to see another day.

During this life-threatening situation, the world continues around you; the sun still sets, an owl still flies, and a deer stands by the car offering all sorts of wisdom. It’s here, as your life seems to be ending, that you start to feel some connection to the world.

Far from Noise is a single-player narrative that’s told solely through dialogue options. But even with such a simple form of game play, Far from Noise still packs a punch. As the in-game conversation progresses, life continues outside of the rusted vehicle. Its these small everyday occurrences happening around you and meaningful dialogue that push your story forward.

far from noise
Image Credit: Far from Noise, George Batchelor

Dialogue options can go in multiple directions. For me, my character dove into a story about why film was so important to her and her choice in major, but for others — the character may have gone to college for an entirely different reason. With conversation, you’re given the chance to get to know this unnamed protagonist. You’re given a front-seat view on why she’s on the edge of the cliff and why she feels the way that she does.

far from noise
Image Credit: Far from Noise, George Batchelor

There’s more to this game than just the story and concept; it’s also the dev’s careful thought that’s placed in subtle detail. It’s the leaves gently swaying on the tree, the gusts of wind, and the transition from day to night. Far from Noise’s color scheme and aesthetic is gorgeous, and the art-style is phenomenal.

On top of appearance is the brilliant original music score by Geoff Lentin. Prior to starting the game, it’s recommended to use headphones – and I, also, 100% suggest this. The sounds set the mood and transports you directly to the edge of the cliff. Like with the visuals, there’s subtle details in sound; details that are easier to notice with headphones. There’s the sounds of waves crashing, birds chirping, and a passing thunderstorm.

far from noise
Image Credit: Far from Noise, George Batchelor

Far from Noise has multiple endings depending on choices made throughout the conversations; so with each play-through, you can expect to see different narrative events. So far, I only have one play-through under my belt, but I expect to do several more to see the changes.

Returning to the conversation of my anxiety, I felt that this game put my mind at ease. There are lines of dialogue throughout the narrative, mostly thanks to the talking deer, that made me stop and think. I was reminded that every event in life thus far has meant something. And the line that really struck a chord in me was, “you worry about death while life ignites around you.”

I found Far from Noise to be a perfect reminder that I shouldn’t let my focus be solely on my worries. The world is going to continue, regardless of what I am doing, and I think it’s time to finally enjoy the beauty of life.

Far from Noise is a wonderful game to play for all kinds of people; gamers and non-gamers can find entertainment in this game. From the simplicity of the gameplay to the beautiful visuals and sounds, Far from Noise is a game that I strongly recommend.

Far from Noise can be purchased on the PS4, Steam, and Itch.io for $7.99. You can also find it for iOS for $2.99! For more information on Far from Noise go here and for information on the developer, George Batchelor, go here!  

Note: Becca purchased this game for iOS after finding out about it on Twitter. She was not asked to write this review and all opinions and thoughts are 100% her own. 

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